Nuevos ICREA

ICREA es una comunidad en expansión. Cada año, nuevos catedráticos de investigación se incorporan a nuestra institución tras la convocatoria Sénior. Esta es la lista de las incorporaciones más recientes. Desde aquí queremos darles una calurosa bienvenida a la comunidad de ICREA: ¡Bienvenidos!

Marco Baroni

Social & Behavioural Sciences
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1 Jan, 2019
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Marco is a (computational) linguist and cognitive scientist. Most recently, his main research interest lies in understanding what and how deep artificial neural networks learn about language, with the ultimate goal to determine what (if anything) is unique about human language. For these purposes, Marco designs deep-learning-based computer programs that learn or evolve linguistic skills in natural scenarios, and tools to analyze the communication systems they develop.

Giuseppe Battaglia

Engineering Sciences
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1 Jan, 2019
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I'm a bioengineer with a keen interest in the soft matter and biological physics. I lead a research group whose activities sit between applied and fundamental research and merge physical and life science intimately. Our long-term goal is to design novel strategies for the engineering of bionic units capable of navigating the human body and deliver either therapeutic agents or diagnostic probes precisely.  We apply a constructionist approach where we mimic biological complexity in the form of design principles to produce functional units from simple building blocks and their interactions. Such an approach, we christened as Molecular Bionics, allows us to both replicate biological complexity to create model surrogates as well as to engineer novel carriers to deliver of anticancer drugs, antibiotics, genes, proteins and diagnostic probes. We achieve both objectives developing experimental and theoretical methods to probe biological complexity and the material/cell interface. We are very active in novel experimental techniques such as molecular engineering, liquid phase electron microscopy and ultrafast imaging as well as very keen to apply both computational modelling and theoretical statistical physics to support our experiments. 

David Irving

Humanities
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1 Mar, 2019
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David is a musicologist, cultural historian, and baroque violinist who specialises in music from the late sixteenth to late eighteenth centuries. His research explores the role of early modern music and musicians as intercultural mediators in worldwide interactions and exchanges. He studies how colonialism, long-distance trade, ethnographic research, and religious conversion shaped and connected the musical lives of mutually distant communities on a worldwide scale. His current projects take a global history approach to study the reverse impact of colonialism and intercultural exchange on European music, and to critique and deconstruct emergent discourses of modernity and Eurocentrism in early modern music historiography. He is active as a performer of early modern music, and has strong interests in Historical Performance Practice.

Ai Koyanagi

Life & Medical Sciences
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5 Mar, 2019
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Ai is a medical doctor and an epidemiologist. Her main research interest concerns health determinants and how they vary by geography or country income level. In particular, mental disorders and their comorbidity with physical disorders are her primary interest. She conducts multi-country epidemiological studies examining the modifiable risk factors for a wide range of mental and physical disorders with high burden at the population level. The goal of her research is to understand why health gaps exist and to provide vital information for the establishment of effective interventions for people to live a long life in full health, and also on how health systems can be improved and disparities be eliminated. 

Núria Montserrat

Life & Medical Sciences
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15 Jan, 2019
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Dr. Montserrat research is focused in understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to organ regeneration together with the development of basic knowledge in the field of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) for human disease modeling. Fascinated with the possibility to combine emerging technologies from the field of pluripotent stem cells (i.e., somatic reprogramming, organoids, among others) together with innovative methodologies from the bioengineering field (i.e., 3D bioprinting, organ-on-chip, among others) Montserrat team explores new scenarios of human disease modeling, with a special focus in kidney and heart related fields.

Natasa Przulj

Life & Medical Sciences
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1 Jan, 2019
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Natasa is a computer scientist working in the area of computational biology and medicine.  Her main research interests lie in designing algorithms for mining systems-level molecular and clinical data, with the ultimate goal to improve biological understanding and therapeutics.  For these purposes, Natasa designs network science and machine learning algorithms that uncover novel molecular mechanisms from large-scale data and give new insight into disease. 

Thomas Surrey

Life & Medical Sciences
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1 Nov, 2019
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Thomas is a biochemist who is interested in understanding intracellular self-organization processes. Specifically, his lab studies the microtubule cytoskeleton which is particularly important during cell division when it builds the mitotic spindle that separates the genomic material of the cell. Thomas is mostly known for developing microscopy-based in vitro reconstitution approaches in which sub-systems of the cytoskeleton are re-built outside of cells from purified proteins, revealing basic mechanisms underlying dynamic cytoskeleton behaviour. 

Martina Wiltschko

Humanities
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1 Jul, 2019
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I explore the foundations that underlie the grammars of human languages. I am particularly interested in the grammatical properties of interactional language having observed that when we have conversations our use of language has characteristics that differ in interesting ways from those of sentences in isolation. Just as there is a systematic logic to the way sentences are constructed, there is also a systematic logic to the way utterances are constructed in interaction. Speakers have very clear intuitions about the well- and ill-formedness of language in interaction. I am fascinated by the question about what, if anything, in the grammar of interactional language is universal as well as the range of variation. Finding answers to these questions will allow us to gain deeper insight into the architecture of the language faculty. Moreover it should lead to a better understanding of the cognitive roots of human language as well as its social impact.