New ICREAs

ICREA is an expanding community. Each year, new research professors join ICREA after the ICREA senior call. This is a list of the most recent incorporations. We would like give them all a very warm welcome to the ICREA community: Benvinguts!

Daniel Brockington

Social & Behavioural Sciences
Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals - UAB (ICTA-UAB)
1 Dec, 2022
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I have worked on different aspects of conservation social science using interdisciplinary approaches to explore, inter alia, the social impacts of conservation policy, the work of NGOs, the role of media and celebrity, and the challenges of measuring change in data poor environments. My books include Fortress Conservation, Nature Unbound (with Rosaleen Duffy and Jim Igoe), Celebrity and the Environment, Celebrity Advocacy and International Development, Prosperity in Rural Africa? (with Christine Noe) and Contested Sustainability (with Stefano Ponte and Christine Noe). I was awarded an Advanced ERC for a five year project on Conservation Data Justice in 2022. Outside academia I have recently completed a trilogy for middle grade readers that is published by African Professional Education Network in Dar es Salaam.

Paula Bustos

Social & Behavioural Sciences
Institute for Political Economy and Governance (IPEG)
1 Sep, 2022
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Paula Bustos

Paula Bustos is ICREA Research Professor at IPEG, Research Fellow at the European Economic Association and the CEPR and Co-editor at the Journal of International Economics. She obtained her PhD in Economics at Harvard University and her Bachelor Degree at Universidad Torcuato di Tella in Argentina. Her first line of research investigated the effects of trade liberalization on technology adoption and the skill composition of exporting firms. A second research line studies the effects of new agricultural technologies, such as GM crops, on structural transformation. More recently, she is investigating the effects of climate change on labor and capital flows in developing countries. Her research has been funded by a Starting Grant from the European Research Council in 2017.

Markus G. Donat

Experimental Sciences & Mathematics
Barcelona Supercomputing Center - Centro Nacional de Supercomputación (BSC-CNS)
1 Feb, 2022
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Markus Donat

I am a climate scientist, and my research focuses on understanding and predicting how extreme climate events such as heatwaves, heavy rainfall and storms will change in the coming years and decades. This involves studying weather and climate processes that drive or amplify such extreme events, and how they are affected by climate variability and long-term climate change related to global warming. I also study the feasibility of land-based approaches to mitigate climate change by removing and storing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and how these mitigation approaches are affected by climate-related risks. I implement my research at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center, where I co-lead the Climate Prediction Group - a research group currently consisting of 20 postdoctoral researchers, PhD students and technical support staff. 

María Escudero

Experimental Sciences & Mathematics
Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2)
1 Sep, 2022
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María Escudero

María’s research combines electrochemistry, materials science and in situ characterisation to elucidate design principles for the discovery and development of novel electrocatalysts for renewable energy conversion and storage. Her work involves engineering the structure of the catalytically active sites at the atomic level, developing advanced nanomaterials, and gaining a mechanistic understanding of relevant reactions for the production of sustainable fuels and chemicals. She has received numerous awards at international and national levels in recognition of her groundbreaking research. In 2022, she has been awarded a ERC Consolidator Grant (2023-2028) for her project ‘ATOMISTIC’ to investigate atomic-scale tailored materials for electrochemical methane activation and conversion into valuable liquid fuels such as methanol.

Francisca Kemper

Experimental Sciences & Mathematics
Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC - ICE)
1 May, 2022
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Ciska Kemper

Ciska Kemper is an astrophysicist, working in an interdisciplinary research area, connecting with chemistry, solid state physics and mineralogy. She is interested in the formation and processing of mineral dust grains in space. She uses ground- and space-based infrared and submillimetre facilities to observe the characteristic signature of different mineralogical components of interstellar dust. She currently focuses on the crystallization and amorphization of silicates. Measuring the crystalline fraction of interstellar silicates can reveal the thermal processing history of the dust grains, as the dust provides a record of the physical conditions it has experienced. She is also interested in silicate nanoclusters, which represent the intermediate phase between the molecular gas and bulk silicate material. With the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope and upcoming capabilities of ground-based millimeter telescopes, detecting this missing link is becoming possible.

Rachel Lowe

Life & Medical Sciences
Barcelona Supercomputing Center - Centro Nacional de Supercomputación (BSC-CNS)
1 Jan, 2022
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Rachel Lowe

Rachel’s research involves modelling the impact of environmental change on infectious disease epidemics, to inform disease control and prevention strategies. She has published high impact research on modelling climate-sensitive disease risk, with a focus on integrating seasonal climate forecasts in dengue early warning systems in the Americas and Southeast Asia. She is the Executive Director of the Lancet Countdown in Europe, a transdisciplinary collaboration tracking progress on health and climate change. In 2018, she won the International Society for Neglected Tropical Diseases (ISNTD) Water Award for Research, in recognition of the quality of her research on the linkages between hydrometeorological extremes and dengue outbreaks and the multi-sectoral relevance for policy and practice.

Hector Orengo

Humanities
Institut Català d'Arqueologia Clàssica (ICAC)
1 Dec, 2022
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Hector A. Orengo is an ICREA Research Professor at the Catalan Institute of Classical Archaeology, where he serves as Research Coordinator and co-directs the Landscape Archaeology Research Group (GIAP). He is also currently an Honorary Research Associate at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge. His research has mainly focused on the analysis of human-landscape dynamics in Mediterranean environments and beyond. He has developed extensive research on computational archaeology that includes, but is not restricted to, GIS and remote sensing techniques, field survey, and site detection methods. He is currently working on the application of machine learning to archaeological research using cloud computing and big data sources (mostly multisource multitemporal satellite data, drone imagery and lidar).

César Rodriguez

Engineering Sciences
Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC)
17 Feb, 2022
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César Rodriguez Emmenegger

My research is inspired by nature and uses its design principles to create materials that seamlessly interface with living matter to develop new paradigms for biomaterials and biomedicine. I focus on introducing new concepts for biointerfaces and “quasi-living” synthetic cells that can harbor selective interactions with cells and tissues. These synthetic cells will enable biologically inspired but augmented or even completely new functions to open new horizons for biomedicine, sensing, and therapeutics. Moreover, this research holds promise to unveil some of the most daunting questions related to the origin of life, the transition from inanimate to living, and the emergence of diseases.

Verena Ruprecht

Life & Medical Sciences
Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG)
1 Dec, 2022
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Verena Ruprecht

I am driven by the question how the shape and body plan of an organism emerges from a single fertilised cell. Our research bridges the fields of biology, biophysics and engineering to understand how tissues of defined form and function are build from dynamic processes at the single cell level. We study mechanisms of cellular information processing and how mechanical forces control cellular morphodynamics and cell and tissue plasticity. We employ quantitative in vivo methods, biophysical tools and advanced fluorescence microscopy and we further design synthetic bottom up assays to control cell behaviours and study principles of multicellular selforganisation. With our research we ultimately aim to understand how tissue form and function is robustly built during development and its implications for tissue homeostasis and cancer.

Leticia Tarruell

Experimental Sciences & Mathematics
Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (ICFO)
1 Jan, 2022
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Leticia Tarruell

Leticia Tarruell is an experimental physicist. She uses ultracold (nanokelvin) atomic gases to synthesize artificial quantum matter and investigate the properties of quantum many-body systems. Her research thus lies at the crossing between quantum optics and condensed-matter physics. Currently, she is particularly interested in the investigation of unconventional superfluid phases, such as ultradilute quantum liquids, chiral Bose-Einstein condensates and topological superfluids, in mixtures of quantum gases in the continuum (ERC Consolidator grant 2021-2026), and in the microscopic study of quantum magnetism with large spin Fermi gases in optical lattices.

Andrea Wulzer

Experimental Sciences & Mathematics
Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE)
1 Oct, 2022
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Andrea Wulzer

I am a particle physicist. My mission is to unveil the microscopic laws that govern the fundamental particles and their interactions. I study what these laws could be, and how they manifest as concrete predictions for a multitude of experimental measurements that are being and will be performed at particle colliders. Devising strategies to extract maximal information on fundamental physics laws from the data collected at the Large Hadron Collider is a main focus of my research. Another goal is to identify new pathways for further progress at ambitious future collider projects and in particular at a muon collider of very high energy. I attack these questions by employing and developing theoretical tools for predictions based on the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics and special relativity, combined in what is known as "Quantum Field Theory", as well as statistical tools for comparing the predictions with the experimental data.